Meet the Founders & Watch Our Latest Video!

What better way to show the world our brand’s mission and process after buying a Tavia period box than with a video of our founders recent trip to Uganada?! Keep reading to learn more about how our trips impact the girls, schools, and villages Tavia helps!

Meet the Founders:

Co-founders Eileen Stephens and Skip Amos visited three different schools of girls in Uganda back in 2016. What they discovered was shocking, disheartening and completely out of the norm compared to the experience of girls in the United States.

Visit our YouTube Channel to get the whole story here: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMtVFI22qOQ&t=116s

And read on to learn more!

What they Discovered:

They learned that 3 out of 10 girls drop-out of school because they don’t have pads to meet their monthly feminine hygiene needs. Coincidentally, they end up missing between 3 and 7 days of school! Imagine your child missing half a week’s worth of teachings and school assignments?!

The simple fact that girls in Uganda increase their future income by 20% every year they manage to pass the 6th grade sparked the Tavia mission.

That huge difference is part of what inspired Eileen and Skip to start a company that not only gives back needed supplies, but also one that educates and debunks period stigma.

In essence, Tavia is a social enterprise company. We offer a subscription-service for your monthly feminine hygiene products, yes, but we take the profits from your subscription to give it back to a local business in Uganda that can produce these sanitary pads and simultaneously paying local women to make these pads.

Tavia does this by adopting a school or a village. Our Co-founders then go in-person and adopt the school where they will help to provide sanitary pads every year so that the girls can stay in school.

What we won’t do is come to a school and provide the pads, giving the girls hope, and then not show back up. Once we select a school or a village, we will stay there, year after year.

 

Additional Facts:

1. Each classroom has between 60 and 100 students. It’s impossible for teachers to give girls the individual attention they need to catch back up after missing school.

2. We know that, statistically, women in East Africa spend 90% of their earnings on their families and community. They also teach their children and pass down the information and skills they have received during their education.

3. One educated woman passes down her education to her children and future generations.

4. It’s a double benefit, helping girls stay in school and helping local women who are already out of school earn an income to support themselves and their families.

5. An annual subscription can last a girl between 12 and 18 months.

Community Support:

Our Co-founders also spoke to the teachers of individual classrooms. 

Here's what one Male teacher had to say:

“You think that you’ve done a small thing, but you’ve done a big thing. Here in Uganda, a teacher might make $30 in a month. It’s really hard for the teachers to see these girls miss school. So, if a girl is really bright, a teacher might take money from their own family to try to buy the products so the girl will stay in school.”

Meet The Girls

While we were in Uganda, we asked some of the girls at one of our adopted schools what they want to do with their education. This is what they told us.

 > “I want to be a lawyer because in Uganda we have many laws, but in Uganda, there are few lawyers."

 > “I want to be a doctor because I want to treat people who are suffering from diseases.”

 > “I want to be an engineer because most of the men outside and the boys in school say that girls can’t do science and they can’t be engineers or doctors. So, I want to be an inspiration to all the girls who are also willing to be engineers or do science like I am willing to do.”

Your Part:

Your subscription gives us the ability to help these schools and makes a direct impact on these girl’s lives. We can’t do this without the power of your contribution.

Help us provide the consistent care and assistance these girls, and all our communities, need.

Thank you.

 

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